Sendak Saw Picture Books As Literature
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Manhattan book buyer Joe Pilla of Rizzoli Books reflects on the legacy of Maurice Sendak. (May 8)

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SHOTLIST:AP EntertainmentNew York, 8 May 20121. Wide exterior of Rizzoli bookstore2. Wide of children's books3. Pan down from Children's Books sign to Maurice Sendak books on display4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Pilla/Assistant Manager, Book Buyer, Rizzoli Bookstore: "Well I think he carries on a tradition as strongly as anyone in this generation of making picture books for children real literature. Something that... because parents appreciate that more than anyone because they're reading these books over and over and over again to their young ones. And something of that quality, well, you not only appreciate it, you embrace it and you want more and more. The only regret, I guess, is that his output diminished over the years, you know, because I think his standards were very, very high. But any time there was a new Sendak publication, oh god, we pounced on it. It was, like, wonderful."5. Close up of "Where the Wild Things Are" on display6. Close up of woman flipping through Sendak book in Italian translation7. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Pilla/Assistant Manager, Book Buyer, Rizzoli Bookstore: "Yes, I think he had an appreciation that children deserve the full stimulation that could come from the visual arts. And he thought that children, I think, should be treated like potential adults and not like porcelain dolls, that they should be exposed to the real world. And I think 'Where the Wild Things Are,' in its very playful, colorful way, does that, well, eminently well."