London Olympics Lessons to Help Rio's Games
Related Videos
Popular
Most Recent
Most Viewed

Description


The International Olympic Committee (IOC) reminded Rio de Janeiro's organisers on Wednesday (November 21) that the clock was ticking for their 2016 Games. The warnings came at the end of a five-day debriefing conference where London organisers sat to share knowledge about the 2012 Olympics with their counterparts in Rio. IOC Commission Chairman, Denis Oswald, underlined the board's confidence that Rio would deliver great Games, but added that postponing the date would not be an option.

Transcript


SHOWS: RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL (NOVEMBER 21, 2012) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. EXTERIOR OF HOTEL WHERE RIO DE JANEIRO AND LONDON OLYMPIC ORGANISERS MET TO SHARE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE GAMES 2. FLAGS OF BRAZIL, GREAT BRITAIN AND OLYMPICS 3. OFFICIALS OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE (IOC) AND RIO DE JANEIRO AND LONDON ORGANISERS ARRIVING FOR NEWS CONFERENCE 4. CLOSE OF OLYMPIC FLAG AND SIGN READING "IOC DEBRIEFING OF LONDON 2012 GAMES" 5. MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE BOARD, NAWAL EL MOUTAWAKEL 7. CLOSE OF OLYMPIC GAMES EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR GILBERT FELLI 9. IOC COMMISSION CHAIRMAN, DENIS OSWALD, SPEAKING IN NEWS CONFERENCE 10. REPORTERS 11. (SOUNDBITE) (English) IOC COMMISSION CHAIRMAN, DENIS OSWALD, SAYING: "I'm sure that the Rio team is aware of the urgency on the fact that the Games will have to be delivered on a specific day; you cannot postpone. As Leo (Chief of Rio's organising committee Leonardo Gryner) said earlier this morning, this is like a football game, but you don't have extended time if you lose time during the game. So it is very important to stick to the calendar and timetable." 12. CAMERAMAN 13. OFFICIALS STANDING UP AT THE END OF NEWS CONFERENCE STORY: The International Olympic Committee (IOC) reminded Rio de Janeiro's organisers on Wednesday (November 21) that the clock was ticking for their 2016 Games. The warnings came at the end of a five-day debriefing conference where London organisers sat to share knowledge about the 2012 Olympics with their counterparts in Rio. IOC Commission Chairman, Denis Oswald, underlined the board's confidence that Rio would deliver great Games, but added that postponing the date would not be an option. "I'm sure that the Rio team is aware of the urgency on the fact that the Games will have to be delivered on a specific day; you cannot postpone. As Leo (Chief of Rio's organising committee Leonardo Gryner) said earlier this morning, this is like a football game, but you don't have extended time if you lose time during the game. So it is very important to stick to the calendar and timetable," he said. The Brazilian city's efforts have been overshadowed by construction delays, cost overruns and overburdened airports, roads and subway lines. Even after a recent economic boom in the South American giant, with soaring investment because of the 2014 World Cup and Olympic Games, Rio remains pock-marked by poor development. The meetings in Rio come only two months after a scandal broke out between the two committees, when British officials discovered that Brazilian members had secretly copied some of their files. The president of Rio's organising committee Carlos Nuzman acknowledged the breach and fired 10 people. Costs for Olympic projects in Brazil are soaring. The country's high taxes and labour costs, known locally as the "Brazil Cost", inflate the price of everything from construction cranes to beachside coconuts. Critics fear the Games costs could far exceed initial estimates of 29 billion reais ($14 billion dollars).