Korean Military Expert: Nuclear Test No Surprise
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Defying U.N. warnings, North Korea on Tuesday conducted its third nuclear test. Korean military intelligence expert retired Colonel Cedric Leighton says the country has set off a larger weapon than the ones in the two previous tests. (Feb. 12)

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DURATION: 1:55 ----------------------------------------SHOTLIST: AP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLYWashington DC - February 12, 2013 1. SOUNDBITE: Cedric Leighton/Retired United States Air Force Colonel: "Well I think it's not a surprise, but it's always a sad development when North Korea feels that it needs to test weapons of this type. These weapons are very dangerous weapons. Really North Korea should be more focused on providing for its people as opposed to trying to challenge the United States or other powers with nuclear weapons.SOURCE: KRT / NO ACCESS NORTH KOREA FILE: Sohae launch station, Northwest North Korea - 12 December 20122 Various of rocket launchAP TELEVISION - AP CLIENTS ONLYWashington DC - February 12, 20133. SOUNDBITE: Cedric Leighton/Retired United States Air Force Colonel: "Basically what you're talking about is a very small, potentially three-by-five-foot device that could be put on top of a missile nose cone. Once you get into that realm, going much smaller is I think is still a little beyond North Korea's capabilities, but they're certainly working on it. So what this does, is it allows them to miniaturize the actual bomb and it puts it on a potentially big missile that has long-range capabilities. Those long-range capabilities can extend for over six thousand miles. And if the mating of the missile body with the nuclear device is successful, then they could potentially affect large swaths of the world that have so far been free of a nuclear threat in recent years and that's the real danger. Can they go even further in terms of miniaturization? That remains to be seen. I don't think they can in the near-term, but give them a year or two and they could probably achieve an even smaller device. And then you have to worry about things like suitcase bombs and other problems of that nature. And that gets into a whole another realm of chemical and biological nuclear devices that could be the so-called dirty bombs that we're very worried about from a terrorism standpoint. The North Koreans aren't beyond doing that."STORYLINE: Defying U.N. warnings, North Korea on Tuesday conducted its third nuclear test in the remote, snowy northeast, taking a crucial step toward its goal of building a bomb small enough to be fitted on a missile capable of striking the United States. North Korea said the atomic test was merely its "first response" to what it called U.S. threats, and said it will continue with unspecified "second and third measures of greater intensity" if Washington maintains its hostility.Korean military intelligence expert retired Colonel Cedric Leighton says the country has set off a larger weapon than the ones in the two previous tests. "Basically what you're talking about is a very small, potentially three-by-five-foot device that could be put on top of a missile nose cone," says Leighton. "Once you get into that realm, going much smaller is I think is still a little beyond North Korea's capabilities, but they're certainly working on it. So what this does, is it allows them to miniaturize the actual bomb and it puts it on a potentially big missile that has long-range capabilities. Those long-range capabilities can extend for over six thousand miles. And if the mating of the missile body with the nuclear device is successful, then they could potentially affect large swaths of the world that have so far been free of a nuclear threat in recent years and that's the real danger."North Korea says its nuclear test was its "first response" to U.S. threats and warns it will continue with unspecified "second and third measures of greater intensity" if the United States maintains its hostility.The North's Foreign Ministry said in a statement that its nuclear test Tuesday was a "self-defensive measure" that does not violate any international law.--------------------------------------------------------------------