How Our Sense of Smell Declines with Age
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Learn how our sense of smell declines as we age. Most of us are sensitive to smell and taste when we are younger but it's not always the case as we get older.The sensor cells in a person’s nose that allows them to detect odors don’t work as well in the elderly population, along with a progressive decrease in the number of nerves that activate the olfactory bulb of the brain. Less mucus in the nose lining, and changes in hormone levels may also contribute to a slow decline in the ability to smell

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Learn how our sense of smell declines as we age. Most of us are sensitive to smell and taste when we are younger but it's not always the case as we get older.The sensor cells in a person’s nose that allows them to detect odors don’t work as well in the elderly population, along with a progressive decrease in the number of nerves that activate the olfactory bulb of the brain. Less mucus in the nose lining, and changes in hormone levels may also contribute to a slow decline in the ability to smell. Other studies have shown that factors other than aging like disease and smoking lead to a decrease in these sensory perceptions. 45 percent of elderly people that participated in a study done by the Science of Aging Knowledge Environment couldn’t smell the odor that is added to natural gas. Our sense of smell also helps us avoid things like spoiled food or contaminated air, and it lets us enjoy fresh air or pleasant fragrances. Taste buds start to atrophy and people’s sense of taste may start to diminish by the time they reach the age of 60, along with the loss of other sensory abilities.