Flying Disc-Throwing Robots Teach Kids Tech
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Thousands of high school students from around the world have put their engineering skills to the test at an international robotics contest. "FIRST" is compared to a "Superbowl of the Mind" mixing math, science and technology with competition. (April 30)

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DURATION: 1:25-----------------------------------------SHOTLIST:HORIZONS -- AP CLIENTS ONLYSHOTLIST:St. Louis, Missouri - 27 April 20131. Close followed by pan and zoom out of robot competition (robots try to shoot Discs into goals at either end of field)2. Close Discs going into goal3. Wide pan of thousands of cheering fans4. Costumed student5. Pan of students dancing to "YMCA"6. Wide of robot competition at Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis7. Closeup, battery installation8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dean Kamen, FIRST Founder and Inventor:9. Mid King Tec team member at controls during competition, their robot passes across shot10. Wide King Tec team member feeding Discs to robot, which fires them at goal at other end of field as opposing team's robot tries to block shots11. Mid drivers from Blue alliance of teams12. Close drivers' faces from Red alliance13. SOUNDBITE (English) Ryan Zoeller, 17-year-old from Team 2169 King Tec from Prior Lake High School in Minnesota:14. Mid robots on playing field15. Pan finals match under way with judges at computers in foreground16. Mid Team 1241 Theory6 team members updating and adjusting robot between finals matches, travels to their teammates, Team 1477 Texas Torque loading Discs in robot17. SOUNDBITE (English) Sagar Rajendran, 18-year-old Driver for Team 1241 Theory6 from Rick Hansen Secondary School in Mississauga, Canada (part of winning Blue Alliance):St. Louis, Missouri - 25 April 201318. SOUNDBITE (English) Dean Kamen, FIRST Founder and Inventor:St. Louis, Missouri - 27 April 201319. Monitor changes to score, tilt down to show Blue Alliance celebrating20. Tilt down from confetti to show Blue Alliance members hugging21. Mid of wildly cheering Blue Alliance members hugging22. Wide members of winning Blue Alliance waving Canadian flag and cheeringSCRIPT:YOU MIGHT NOT NEED A ROBOT THAT FLIPS DISCS INTO A TARGET--BUT IT SURE LOOKS LIKE FUN. THE CROWD OF 25-THOUSAND IN ST. LOUIS' EDWARD JONES ARENA CERTAINLY SEEMED TO BE ENJOYING THE COMPETITION.THIS EVENT MIGHT LOOK LIKE PLAYTIME --BUT IT'S REALLY ABOUT MATH AND SCIENCE.SOUNDBITE (English) Dean Kamen, FIRST Founder and Inventor:"Our tag-line ought to be: you can lead a kid to knowledge, but you can't make him think."THE COMPETITION IS CALLED "FIRST"--FOR INSPIRATION AND RECOGNITION OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. IT DRAWS STUDENTS FROM 17 COUNTRIES AND OFFERS 15-MILLION DOLLARS IN COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS.SOUNDBITE (English) Ryan Zoeller, 17-year-old from Team 2169 King Tec from Prior Lake High School in Minnesota:"This is more energy than I've ever been in. This is a lot of fun. There's a lot of pressure, but at the same time, there's no place with as much fun as there is here."THE CHALLENGE THIS YEAR IS TO GET THE ROBOTS TO SCORE AS MANY DISCS AS POSSIBLE IN JUST OVER TWO MINUTES. THEN THE ROBOTS HAVE TO CLIMB PYRAMIDS.SOUNDBITE (English) Sagar Rajendran, 18-year-old Driver for Team 1241 Theory6 from Rick Hansen Secondary School in Mississauga, Canada (part of winning Blue Alliance):"It's just crazy how you can make a game, build robots and compete. It's like a sporting event. It's like the NFL, it's like the Superbowl for the mind."SOUNDBITE: (English) Dean Kamen, FIRST Founder and Inventor:"We just showed kids - particularly women and minorities - in this country that science and engineering and mathematics is just as accessible, just as cool, just as much fun and way more likely to lead to great careers than bouncing a ball."WHILE NOT EVERYONE WINS THIS COMPETITION--YOU COULD SAY EVERYONE IS A WINNER, HAVING LEARNED VALUABLE TECH SKILLS.MATT FRIEDMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS.--------------------------------------------------------------------