FDA: High Fructose Corn Syrup Can’t Be Called ‘Corn Sugar’
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration struck down a petition from the Corn Refiners’ Association to change the name of high fructose corn syrup to “c

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(Image source: World Community Cookbook )   BY TRAVIS ZIMPFER The FDA shot down a petition by the Corn Refiners Association to change the name of high fructose corn syrup to “corn sugar.” ABC’s Good Morning America says the Corn Refiners wanted to change the name to something less technical. “The FDA has rejected a proposal from the food industry, which wanted to give a more consumer-friendly name to high fructose corn syrup.  That’s the sweetener that many blame for the obesity crisis.” Environmental blog One Green Planet explains one reason the FDA said “nope” to the name change.  “...the name ‘corn sugar’ is already used to describe dextrose, a sweetener that has been marketed for over 30 years as acceptable for individuals with fructose intolerance or malabsorption.” The Mayo Clinic says scientists have found mixed reports on whether or not high fructose corn syrup is more dangerous than regular sugar. “Some research studies have linked consumption of large amounts of any type of added sugar — not just high-fructose corn syrup — to ... health problems ...” While the scientific community continues to analyze HFCS, the FDA ruling has sparked a new round of debate around the common food additive.   A column from The Salt Lake Tribune praises the FDA for the decision, saying that the longer, more complicated name sticks out to the average consumer. “Forcing HFCS to retain its artificial-sounding, polysyllabic moniker should help consumers be aware that sweetness in our diets is something we get too much of, and that… is something we should change.” But the Corn Refiners Association sure isn’t happy with the FDA.   MSNBC published the response of the association’s president who says the FDA … “… did not address or question the overwhelming scientific evidence that high fructose corn syrup is a form of sugar and is nutritionally the same as other sugars. The fact remains that the vast majority of American consumers are confused about HFCS.” Regardless of what it’s called, HFCS will still be in all kinds of foods, like cereals and sodas, in your grocery store.  And as Shakespeare would say, any corn syrup that has undergone enzymatic processing to attain a desired level of sugary goodness can go by any other name. But it will taste just as sweet.