Carly Rae Jepsen Joins Boy Scout Concert Boycott
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Carly Rae Jepsen is joining the protest against the Boy Scouts’ anti-gay policy by pulling out of a headlining spot at its National Scouting Jamboree

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Image Source: Wikimedia Commons BY ASHLEY CARR ANCHOR CANDICE AVILES   Carly Rae Jepsen is joining the protest against the Boy Scouts’ anti-gay policy by pulling out of a headlining spot at its National Scouting Jamboree.   As CBC News Now reports, Jepsen has been an advocate speaking out about gay rights -- she featured a gay couple in the music video for her hit song “ Call me Maybe. ” “She says she was not aware when she signed up for the concert that the Boy Scouts of America does not allow, as an official policy, it does not allow gays into the organization.” Jepsen has been facing pressure to drop the gig. It began with Derek Nance -- an eagle scout who drew attention from the media earlier this year when he was fired from his role as scout program director for being gay. When Nance heard Jepsen and the band Train were headlining the Jamboree, he took to Change.org to start a petition, invoking... “Please join me in urging Carly Rae Jepsen and Train to speak out against the Boy Scouts of America's anti-gay policy and agree to step down as the headlining act ... if the Boy Scout's National Council doesn't change this policy in May.” Just hours after the petition got the attention of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, or GLAAD, on March 1st,  Train issued a response saying they would only participate in the Jamboree if the Boy Scouts changed their policy. Just four days the petition had reached over 65,000 signatures,  and Jepsen took to Twitter to declare: “As an artist who believes in equality for all people, I will not be participating in the Boy Scouts of America Jamboree this summer...” Both Jepsen and Train say they will perform at the July show if the Boy Scouts changes its policy. But, again, that won’t be known for a while. As CNN reports, back in January, the group originally decided against a change in policy before reconsidering and saying it needed more time. A vote will be had at their annual meeting in May. But for now, a representative for the Boy Scouts responded to the withdrawal by saying everyone has a right to their own opinion and the group is focused on having a great Jamboree.