A Hot Hong Kong Commodity -- Banned Books.
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Hong Kong's well known as a haven for Chinese shoppers seeking tax-free luxury goods But the former British colony also offers something many outside China take for granted. Uncensored books. Since the handover back to China in 1997, Hong Kong has preserved its liberal publication rights, while on the mainland information is still on a tight leash. Author Gordon Chang.

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EDITORS PLEASE NOTE THIS EDIT CONTAINS CONVERTED 4:3 MATERIAL Hong Kong's well known as a haven for Chinese shoppers seeking tax-free luxury goods But the former British colony also offers something many outside China take for granted. Uncensored books. Since the handover back to China in 1997, Hong Kong has preserved its liberal publication rights, while on the mainland information is still on a tight leash. Author Gordon Chang. (SOUNDBITE) (English) AUTHOR OF 'THE COMING COLLAPSE OF CHINA', GORDON CHANG, SAYING: "You see this almost book tourism where people go shopping for books that are considered to be subversive on the mainland." (SOUNDBITE) (English) REUTERS REPORTER, TESSA DUNLOP, SAYING: "I'm here at the People Book Cafe in Hong Kong, where the owner says around 90 percent of customers are from the mainland." Manager Paul Tang says sales have jumped 30% this year, all thanks to China's recent leadership transition. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PEOPLE BOOK CAFE DIRECTOR, PAUL TANG, SAYING: "When they discover our bookstore they're really happy because all the information they're missing - it's the missing pieces." (SOUNDBITE) (English) REUTERS REPORTER, TESSA DUNLOP, SAYING: "But if you are looking for something racier, you can read love stories or books about officials' mistresses or even Wen Jiabao's alleged hidden fortune." Retired chemistry professor Mr Li told me he was delighted to have access to all this literature, something he couldn't get when he was younger, during the Cultural Revolution. Chinese book buyers can face consequences if they try bringing some purchases back home. This penalty letter was posted on Weibo, China's version of Twitter - it orders the confiscation of sensitive publications brought into China and tells the offender to respond to authorities. But despite customs checks and possible punishments, many mainlanders will continue flocking to Hong Kong to brush up on their own country.